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Top Ten Albums 2002
the overgrown supershit


by: bill aicher

2002 is nearly at a close, and like everyone else it's time for Music-Critic.com to announce our picks for the top ten albums of 2002. As you'll see while we count down, 2002 was an unbelievably strong year for great music... we unfortunately had to leave off a lot of favorites this time around. Also, you'll see 2002 was one of the best years in hip-hop... but that's all we're saying for now...

Music-Critic.com's Top Ten Albums of 2002.

Royskopp

Number 10en
Royskopp
Melody A.M.

2002 was the year of sub-par chillout releases, as the genre became the bandwagon to jump on. However, amidst all the mediocrity, relatively few stood out. On their debut album, Melody A.M., Norway's Royskopp shined.
full review

 

Missy Elliot

Number 9ine
Missy Elliot
Under Construction

Not only was "Work It" one of the funkiest hip-hop tracks released this year, but Missy Elliot proved with Under Construction once and for all that she is the female force to be reckoned with in hip-hop.
full review

 

Doves

Number 8ight:
Doves
The Last Broadcast

The sophomore release from British rock group, Doves is proof that not everyone can agree on a great album. In our own review from Peter Naldrett, we gave it an initial diss... but here it is on our top ten.
full review

 

Common

Number 7even:
Common
Electric Circus

Common's foray into semi-experimentalism in hip-hop was by far one of the year's most innovative releases, and one of the most ambitious hip-hop releases ever. For those not afraid of newness in hip-hop, you couldn't do better than Electric Circus.
full review

 

Flaming Lips

Number 6ix:
The Flaming Lips
Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots

For years critics have known that when a Flaming Lips record drops, you best pay attention. This became more true after The Soft Bulletin - and Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots was an unbelievable follow-up. There's a reason we keep saying these guys are going to save the world someday.
full review

 

Blackalicous

Number 5ive:
Blackalicious
Blazing Arrow

Even with all the innovations going on in the world of hip-hop, it's nice to know that a solid, classic album can still be made. Blackalicious's Blazing Arrow is about as solid as they come. If you give a damn about music at all, you'll be digging on this disc.
full review

 

Promise Ring

Number 4our:
Promise Ring
Wood/Water

Milwaukee's Promise Ring was a longtime favorite among the emo crowd, but their last two albums found them pursuing more traditional pop/rock routes. On their final album, they worked with Stephen Street, and came out with something truly remarkable.
full review

 

Wilco

Number 3hree:
Wilco
Yankee Hotel Foxtrot

After being dumped by their label, it was a question as to when, if ever, Wilco's Yankee Hotel Foxtrot would see the light of day. Fortunately it did, because it's an album destined to become a modern classic.
full review

 

Sigur Ros

Number 2wo:
Sigur Ros
()

Iceland's Sigur Ros decided to not even title their latest album or any of the songs, and sang in gibberish "Hopelandic," but once again they put out a truly remarkable album of ethereal, beautiful music that'd even make Mogwai jealous.
full review

 

Cornershop

Number 1ne:
Cornershop
Handcream for a Generation

Cornershop's follow-up to When I Was Born for the 7th Time came out of leftfield for some. It wasn't the artsy masterpiece When I Was Born... was, instead Handcream... was by far the most fun album of 2002. And it's our pick for #1.
full review

Check out our top ten albums of 2001.

Check out our top ten albums of 2000.


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